women’s soccer Archive

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The new Canada kit

Victor Montagliani, Emily Zurrer, Julian de Guzman, Desiree Scott, Mike Shoemaker

Victor Montagliani, Emily Zurrer, Julian de Guzman, Desiree Scott, Mike Shoemaker


Canadian national-teamers Desiree Scott, Emily Zurrer and Julian de Guzman posed in the team’s new kits Friday. The new Umbro kits were unveiled at the flagship SportChek store at West Edmonton Mall.

Edmonton will have more games at the Women’s World Cup than any of the other host cities, including the first two Canada group-stage matches.

The men’s team begins World Cup qualifying in June and then will be in the Gold Cup, with a potential berth in the centennial edition of the Copa America on the line.

Since The 11‘s readers have always flocked to stories about new kits, here are some pics from the event, also featuring Canadian Soccer Association President Victor Montagliani and Umbro Canada Vice-President Mike Shoemaker.
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Canadian women don’t score much in Cyprus, but give up even less

Christine Sinclair PHOTO: Ville Vuorinen

Christine Sinclair PHOTO: Ville Vuorinen

Before the Cyprus Cup kicked off, Canadian national women’s team coach John Herdman talked about how important it would be for his players to remain organized. He talked about how vital it was for the team to keep its shape.

Throughout the tournament, he emphasized how it was key for his players to keep things tight.

So, maybe, just maybe, we shouldn’t fret too much about Canada losing the final to England by a 1-0 score on Wednesday. Lianne Sanderson’s goal came as both teams coped with driving rain. And, the goal was the only time in three group-stage games and the final that Canada conceded. One goal against in four matches — well, not an entirely terrible return.

If the emphasis of this tournament was on defence, we shouldn’t worry too much that Canada scored just four times in four games in its final major tournament ahead of the Women’s World Cup. Right? Wrong. Of course we’re going to worry. The slate of 1-0 and 2-0 results in the Cyprus Cup — which generally attracts what Herdman refers to as the “second-tier” teams while the major powers go to the Algarve Cup — is not going to give Canadian fans the confidence to believe we’ll be able to find a lot of goals outside of our top target striker, Christine Sinclair.
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Herdman on CNWT: “There’s not too many cards left up our sleeves”

John Herdman

John Herdman

We’re now at the stage of the poker game where it’s time to call. We’ve gone through the bets, the bluffs and the folds.

As Canada’s national women’s team prepares for the Cyprus Cup — its final tournament before the Women’s World Cup, coach John Herdman knows he has very few secrets left to keep. He knows he has to have his team playing to its strengths — and that means there’s very little left to hold back and to keep those scouting for their World Cup opponents guessing.

“You can’t hide everything,” Herdman said in a conference call on Tuesday. “You’ve got to do what you do better than the other teams.

“There’s not too many cards left up our sleeves.”

Canada begins group-stage play on Wednesday. Scotland, not a World Cup side, will provide the opposition. Then it’s South Korea, a World Cup qualifier that won’t be in Canada’s WWC first-round group, and then another non-World Cup side, Italy.
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Mind games or no mind games? Chinese utilized a strong lineup in loss to the Canadian women

Christine Sinclair

Christine Sinclair

Canada’s final game of the BaoAn Cup was by far the most intriguing of the tournament, even though the Canadian had already clinched the championship.

Why? Because Canada had to face the tournament hosts from China. In a few months time, Canada will open the Women’s World Cup with a group-stage game against the Chinese at Edmonton’s Commonwealth Stadium.

Before the BaoAn Cup, Canadian women’s team coach John Herdman mused that he could approach the game against China in one of two ways — he could play an experimental lineup that might keep the Chinese guessing all the way to June, or play a strong, first-choice team and get the psychological edge by beating the Chinese in their own stadium.

Canada won the game 2-1, with obviously first-choice striker Christine Sinclair scoring twice — one from the penalty spot. Herdman chose to start a strong lineup at least in terms of defending and attacking. But without the services of midfielders Sophie Schmidt and Diana Matheson, he had youngsters Jessie Fleming and Josee Belanger in the mix. Stephanie Labbe started in goal — and Erin McLeod has established herself as the clear No. 1; we’d expect to see McLeod playing the Chinese at the WWC. But, even though youngsters Fleming, Belanger and attacker Janine Beckie got significant minutes, you couldn’t guarantee that those wouldn’t be players you’d see facing China in June.
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Canada will send just 13 allocated players to NWSL in 2015

NWSL-Logo-516x340The Canadian Soccer Association will use only 13 of its available 16 allocation slots in NWSL this season.

Since the launch of NWSL, the CSA has paid the salaries of up to 16 Canadian players in that league, guaranteeing them slots in the top pro circuit in North America. On Wednesday, the list of allocated players for the 2015 season was announced, and there were only 13 names on it. (Find the list at the bottom of the document).

The CSA confirmed that it retained the ability to allocate up to 16 players in 2015. A CSA representative told us that some of the player who could have been allocated have chosen instead to pursue other opportunities outside of NWSL.

According to the CSA, “Canadian National Team players will remain in the Centralized Development Program to begin and train in that environment throughout the season, but will have the opportunity to participate in the first three to four NWSL matches before the start of the FIFA Women’s World Cup. The NWSL will also a take brief 12-day break during the group stages of the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2015 in Canada.”

Midfielder Desiree Scott, who left NWSL last season to play in England with Notts County, is not on the allocation list. In the current issue of Plastic Pitch, she said that she will decide where she will go after the Women’s World Cup, but was enthusiastic over a possible return to England. Interestingly, Rhian Wilkinson, who withdrew herself from the NWSL last season, will return in 2015.
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Sinclair wins Player of the Year honour for 11th straight time; says she has become a more complete player

sincy2014She’s Canada’s all-time leading scorer, but she only scored once for the national team in 2014.

But the drop-off in goal production didn’t stop Christine Sinclair from being named the Women’s National Player for the 11th straight year. You’d have to go back to 2003 to find someone else other than Sinclair (Charmaine Hooper, for the trivia buffs) who has won the award.

Sinclair also scored seven times for the Portland Thorns of the NWSL.

While she said that the drop-off in scoring has weighed on her mind, Sinclair insisted that she’s become “a more complete soccer player” under the tutelage of coach John Herdman. She said that she’s become more of a leader on the team, and she’s also been asked to perform other tasks than simply go up top and score goals. She’s been asked to drop into a midfield role on occasion.
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PLASTIC PITCH 4 is out today!

10349900_1008071179208840_1372189140274955851_nIssue 4 of Plastic Pitch is out today!

What will you find inside?

• We profile Canadian keeper John Smits, winner of the NASL’s Golden Glove award;

• We sit down with Desiree Scott to talk about her decision to leave NWSL for England, and how she feels about Canada’s preparations for the Women’s World Cup

• Canadians in indoor soccer; a look at the Milwaukee Wave and its Canadian coach, Giuliano Oliviero, and its Canadian star player, Ian Bennett. And we look at how the new Major Arena Soccer League could finally stabilize the pro indoor game in North America

• We look at the birth, successes and trials of League1 Ontario.
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Teams visit WWC sites: Commonwealth praised, BC Place blasted

“The turf in Vancouver, in my opinion, is not good enough for the World Cup.”

PHOTO ABOVE: Dutch coach Roger Reijners, Australian coach Alen Stajcic, Swedish coach Pia Sundhage, Swiss coach Martina Voss-Tecklenburg

The days following the Women’s World Cup draw has seen the coaches and managers of the 23 visiting teams travelling throughout Canada and checking out the venues.

Managers from Sweden, Switzerlands, the Netherlands and Australia were at snow-covered Commonwealth Stadium in Edmonton on Tuesday. Organizers were able to plow out a strip of turf from underneath a heavy blanket of the white stuff so the coaches could actually inspect the playing surface.

All four of the managers said they are making preparations for a World Cup played entirely on turf. The Dutch played all of their home qualifiers on turf and will play all upcoming friendlies on turf, said coach Roger Reijners.

But Swiss coach Martina Voss-Tecklenburg said that the venue that will host the World Cup final simply isn’t good enough. She said that Commonwealth’s turf is just fine — and the turf is good quality. But the Polytan surface she saw at BC Place worried her.
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Fury pulls the plug on its W-League program

In late July of 2012, after scoring late in regulation time to tie the championship game, the Ottawa Fury women’s side won the W-League title in the shootout.

Two years later, and the Fury’s W-League team is no more.

In a briefly worded statement, the Fury announced that it will no longer be fielding a team in the W-League.

“The Fury has been an elite W-League team for more than a decade and we are very proud of the incredible on-field success of our players and our teams,” said Fury FC President (and USL hall of famer) John Pugh in the release. “We thank the fans for their support and hope they enjoy watching the many players with Fury connections that will play in this summer’s FIFA Women’s World Cup.”

The team said that cutting the women’s team was a “business decision”

Since 2000, the Fury have won the second-most games in the W-League and are perennially a contender to go the league’s final four. Coach Dominic Oliveri has done a wonderful job in creating what was arguably the best women’s soccer program in North America outside of NWSL.

The Fury has been home to many women’s national-team players, such as Marie-Eve Nault, Kelly Parker, Christina Julien, Diana Matheson and Rhian Wilkinson.

In 2014, notable Canadians Kadeisha Buchanan, Bryanna McCarthy, Christabel Oduro and Shelina Zadorsky spent time with the Fury.

CANADIAN SOCCER. CANADIAN STORIES. PLASTIC PITCH MAGAZINE. Download it on Apple. Download it on Android.

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Round one to the CSA: Human Rights Tribunal co-chair won’t rush the turfgate case

fwwc2015_oe_4ct_lThe Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario has rejected a plea to expedite its hearing of the grass vs. turf case.

A group of women’s players, including Americans Alex Morgan and Abby Wambach, Germany’s Nadine Angerer and Japan’s Yuki Ogimi had petitioned the HRTO to hear their plea against the use of artificial turf fields at the 2015 Women’s World Cup. The Canadian Soccer Association and FIFA have defended the use of the artificial-turf fields, while the women’s players named in the suit (a total of 15 on the document) wanted to speed the case forward in hopes of getting a ruling in favour of grass in time for it to have an impact on the WWC.

The CSA’s lawyers have stated that they doesn’t feel the HRTO has the jurisdiction to rule on a Women’s World Cup, as five of the six venues being used in the tournament are located outside of the province of Ontario.

On Friday, HRTO co-chair Jo-Anne Pickel rejected the players’ plea to expedite the case, basically killing any chance to have it heard in time to have a meaningful impact on the WWC.

She wrote that, as expedited cases put all other matters before the HRTO on the back burner, it would be unfair to all the other applicants. It would be unfair of the HRTO to delay other cases of racial, workplace and/or gender discrimination to accommodate the players.
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