World Cup Archive

8

Montopoli: Canada has no plans to share World Cup 2026 bid with another nation

Peter Montopoli

Peter Montopoli

The General Secretary of the Canadian Soccer Association made it clear: When Canada bids for the World Cup, it won’t have a dance partner.

Peter Montopoli was in Edmonton Wednesday, speaking to the Chamber of Commerce about the coming U-20 Women’s World Cup and the Women’s World Cup in 2015. But the Canadian Soccer Association’s bid for the 2026 World Cup, which is expected to go to FIFA some time in 2016, also came up.

And, when he was asked about the possibility of submitting a shared bid, Montopoli said the answer is no.

“It’s a single bid. It’s Canada, at this moment. It’s Canada, the Canadian Soccer Association that will be bidding, and we will continue along that line. There really have been no discussions on joint bids, either Mexico or the United States. It’s not a position we’re taking. It is a straight bid from the Canadian Soccer Association.”

Montopoli said that getting the 2026 World Cup would complete a journey that began in Edmonton in 2002, when 45,000 fans attended the final of the then-named U-19 Women’s World Championship, a predecessor of the U-20 Women’s World Cup. FIFA officials were startled by the Canadian suppot for women’s youth soccer, and that final put Canada on the road to hosting the U-20 World Cup in 2007, then the U-20 Women’s World Cup this year and the Women’s World Cup in 2015.
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9

NASL Commissioner talks about Canada’s long-term plans, expansion and league format

Bill Peterson

Bill Peterson

NASL Commissioner Bill Peterson says his league is looking closely at one unnamed Canadian market as an expansion candidate, and is supportive of the long-term goals of the Canadian Soccer Association.

In a state-of-the-NASL conference call held Thursday morning, Peterson said he would be talking with CSA officials later in the day to discuss the organization’s long-term vision for the game in Canada. And he said the NASL would support the CSA’s vision, even if it includes the eventual launch of a Canadian Division “1A” league.

“We will have discussions with the CSA looking at the long-term future, what it looks like,” Peterson said. “We are open and supportive to what the long-term goals are going to be.”
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3

FCE’s home opener against the Fury moved to Commonwealth

PHOTO: CITY OF EDMONTON

PHOTO: CITY OF EDMONTON

FC Edmonton has announced that its NASL fall-season home opener against the Ottawa Fury will be moved to Commonwealth Stadium.

But just how many — or how few — sections of the 56,000-seat stadium will be filled could depend on television licensing issues.

The Eddies were forced to move the game because they could not be 100-per-cent guaranteed that the installation of a new turf surface at Clarke Stadium would be done in time for Sunday’s match. General Manager Rod Proudfoot said it was likely that the Clarke Stadium work would be done on time. But, “likely” isn’t the same as “guaranteed.” And even if there was a one per cent chance that the Clarke resurfacing wasn’t going to be on schedule, the game had to be moved.

Now, this is where it gets tricky. The World Cup final kicks off Sunday at 1 p.m. local time. FC Edmonton hopes that it can open the Commonwealth gates at noon, and then show the game on the brand new Jumbotron that has been installed at the stadium. But it’s not that simple. The team confirmed it needs to ensure it has the rights to show the game at a ticketed event. And that means approaching either the CBC and/or FIFA.
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0

The Power and Politics of the 2014 World Cup and Beyond: Join us for a night of stimulating soccer discussion

2014FIFAWorldCuplogo2-FIFAWant to talk about the World Cup, and what it means on a global scale? How soccer influences international politics? And what it will mean if Canada wins the right to host the 2026 World Cup?

The Canadian International Council is sponsoring a free-to-attend event on Tuesday, July 8. Featuring the CBC’s Tim Adams, FC Edmonton coach and former Canadian international player and manager Colin Miller and yours truly, we will discuss the World Cup and its impact on the world, plus a look at what soccer success on the domestic level would mean to Canada as a whole. It’s a night that meshes sport, international relations and political discourse, with an opportunity for the audience to ask questions and get involved in the discussion.

(UPDATE: Canadian Soccer Hall of Famer Janine Helland has been added to the panel!)

The night : “The Power and Politics of the 2014 World Cup and Beyond” will start at 6 p.m. July 8 at The Pint in downtown Edmonton at 10125 109th St.

The info can be found by clicking the poster link below.
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3

CBC’s great World Cup numbers and how they could boost Canada’s bid for 2026

2014FIFAWorldCuplogo2-FIFAMy inbox regularly pings when yet another press release about TV ratings comes out.

It sorta works like this. If ratings are good (such as this World Cup, or Olympic hockey numbers), the network that’s got the rights wants to tell as many people as it can about its success: How many people watch, what are the key demographics, when the broadcast reached its peak viewership.

Now, if the ratings are poor, we get nothing, nada. How did last year’s MLS Cup do, ratings-wise, on TSN? We didn’t get a press release on that.

Of course, the average journalist gets so many of these big-TV-numbers releases, that they simply become background noise.

But the CBC’s numbers for this World Cup deserve a mention. Not because anyone needs to be pumping up the CBC’s tires. The network has already announced that, in its post-NHL life, it is getting out of the sports business. Why do we need to celebrate the numbers? Because the outstanding TV viewership tallies can be used by the Canadian Soccer Association for a greater purpose.
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14

Montagliani’s vision: A Canadian Division 1A that “coexists” with MLS, NASL

Victor Montagliani

Victor Montagliani

The second issue of Plastic Pitch, released today, features a 16-page section on Canada’s bid for the 2026 World Cup, with stories from five different writers.

(For those new to us, Plastic Pitch is our dedicated magazine for iPad, smartphones and Android readers — you can get either issue 1 or 2 or subscribe through iTunes, Newsstand, Google Play or Amazon, links at the bottom of the article)

But, there’s one part of that World Cup section that’s sure to get a lot of attention. And that’s the stated Canadian Soccer Association goal of an all-Canadian Division One — or “1A,” as CSA President Victor Montagliani called it in our interview.

Say it with me. An all-Canadian league. Division one, not two or three or four.

Over the last year, I’d heard whispers about the possibility of an all-Canadian Division One. But getting anyone to confirm that… well, that was the thing. It was like the Great White Whale. Now, it’s out there. Officially. The recognition that Canada needs its own league; that we can’t redefine our developmental pyramid unless a Canadian Division One — which puts the interest of Canadian soccer at the forefront — is at the top.
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2

Issue 2 of Plastic Pitch: An in-depth look at Canada’s 2026 World Cup bid

PPitch2_SUMMER_UNCORRECTEDAs we enjoy the current World Cup action from Brazil, Canadians can wonder what it would be like to host the world 12 years from now.

Can we afford it? How far are we into our bid for the 2026 World Cup? What kind of support exists from CONCACAF? And what would happen to all of the hard work that’s already gone into the bid if FIFA takes the 2022 World Cup away from Qatar and gives it to the United States?

The second issue of Plastic Pitch, out today, features a 16-page section on Canada’s bid for the World Cup. Get it today on iOS(CLICK HERE), Google Play(CLICK HERE) or Amazon(CLICK HERE). For current subscribers, just grab the new issue when you open the app.
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3

CSA continues to talk about 2026 World Cup bid: Why an early statement of intent is vital

Victor Montagliani

Victor Montagliani

The Canadian Soccer Association’s plan to bid for the 2026 World Cup isn’t exactly a secret. In fact, it’s been openly talked about since FIFA confirmed this country as the host of the 2015 Women’s World Cup.

CSA president Victor Montagliani continued the pattern this weekend, telling the CBC that all the ducks are being placed in a row for an official bid that will come in a couple of years time. (CLICK HERE)

This only echoes CSA General Secretary Peter Montopoli’s comments that he made to the media in Edmonton back in March, where he called the U-20 World Cup and Women’s World Cup the “building blocks” toward a 2026 World Cup bid. (CLICK HERE)

Montagliani and Montopoli are doing the right thing, revealing the CSA’s intentions well ahead of the actual bid process.

Of course, how seriously our bid will be received will depend on how well we do as hosts of the Women’s World Cup. But, by making no secret of Canada’s intentions, we’re the first country in CONCACAF to plant our flag. And that’s important. CONCACAF feels that this region will get the 2026 World Cup (CLICK HERE), especially after the American bid was rebuffed for Qatar 2022. Of course, that could mean there are American and/or Mexican bids to come, depending on how many billions of dollars or pesos their governments wish to spend (or not spend).

Canada is in a unique position. We share our first division with the United States — or, as the cynic would say, we have three Canadian teams in American first division. But, with an early statement of intent, the CSA can use that relationship to its favour.
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0

Webb: CONCACAF nation should host 2026 World Cup

Jeffrey Webb

Jeffrey Webb

If CONCACAF president Jeffrey Webb gets his way, the 2026 World Cup will be played in the CONCACAF region.

Speaking in a press conference prior to the opening of the 2013 Gold Cup, Webb was asked about the potential of the tournament returning to the region for the first time since the United States hosted in 1994 with Webb admitting he’s already spoken to the heads of the Mexican and American federations as well as Victor Montagliani from the Canadian Soccer Association about such a possibility.

“It doesn’t matter — for me or one of the 41 members, whether it’s the United States, Mexico or Canada, I believe it is too important for us to host the World Cup in 2026,” Webb said emphatically. “And that will have been 32 years, which would have been the longest time since World War II that we have not hosted the World Cup as a confederation.”

The United States were runners up to Qatar for the rights to host the 2022 World Cup and Webb said the CONCACAF region were the biggest losers when FIFA decided to stop rotating the rights through the confederations after awarding 2014 to CONMEBOL and Brazil.

Naturally, the optimist would be delighted at the prospect of Canada hosting a World Cup but with a massive injection of money that would be required for stadium infrastructure and the high possibility of white-elephant venues at the conclusion of the tournament, it would be a tall ask for Canada to front a tournament by itself. But both Montagliani and CSA General Secretary Peter Montopoli have strongly hinted that Canada will have an all-in bid in place.
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0

Canada prepares the “building blocks” for World Cup 2026

fifa-logoA couple of days ago, Canadian Soccer Association General Secretary Peter Montopoli was at Edmonton’s City Hall and was asked about a possible bid for the 2026 World Cup.

Montopoli described the hosting of the 2014 U-20 Women’s World Cup and the 2015 Women’s World Cup as “building blocks” towards a bid for 2026; and, he noted that, in July of 2015, Canada can boast that it’s hosted all the major tournaments except for the biggest one of them all.

Montopoli was in Edmonton for the announcement of the city as the host of the opening ceremonies and first game of the 2015 Women’s World Cup, so he was right to feel bullish.

There’s no doubt that there is a section of FIFA voters who are enamoured with Canada; despite the fact we don’t have the on-field profile of CONCACAF neighbours Mexico and the United States, we offer stability and certainty, without the American bluster that seems to turn so many international voters off (see: IOC vote and Chicago, 2014 Olympics, U.S. World Cup bid, 2022).
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